ink painting

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Philosophy and spirituality in the art of ink painting

Philosophy and spirituality in the art of ink painting:

This article is to touch on the subject of one of the most important aspects of the Far Eastern ink painting, which is spirituality. I added supportive quotations of the great Masters, which should complete the image, and assist with comprehending the world view and the ideologies of the artists who lived centuries ago…

http://www.ink-treasures.com/artworks/ink-painting-paper/spiritual-artwork/124-philosophy-spirituality-art-ink-painting/

 

 

 

Philosophy and methods in Chinese painting

Philosophy and methods in Chinese painting:

In this article I would like to briefly discuss a few interesting facts on the essence of the ink painting. For this purpose, I will support myself here with the translations of the famous book entitled “Overview of painting (圖畫見聞志)” by Guo Ruoxu (郭若虚, 11th century) – who was interpreting the impossibility of mastering the Spirit Resonance…

http://www.ink-treasures.com/artworks/ink-painting-paper/spiritual-artwork/125-philosophy-methods-chinese-painting/

 

History of Japanese ink painting in Asuka, Nara, Heian and Kamakura periods

History of Japanese ink painting in Asuka, Nara, Heian and Kamakura periods (chapter 1):

The traditional ink painting art, known in Japan as sumi-e (墨絵; or suibokuga, 水墨画; sometimes also as zen-ga, 禅画, though the latter literally means “Zen painting”), originated in China during Tang dynasty (唐朝, 618 – 907). It was then introduced to Korea and Japan via sea trade exchange, brought by Buddhist monks of the Chan (Japanese: Zen; 禅)sect. The first contact of Japanese people with the Chinese art of…

http://www.ink-treasures.com/history/ink-painting/japanese-ink-painting/

 

History of Japanese ink painting in Muromachi and Azuchi-Momoyama periods

History of Japanese ink painting in Muromachi and Azuchi-Momoyama periods (chapter 2):

The two great patrons of the art of ink painting were shoguns Ashikaga Yoshimitsu (足利 義満, 1358 – 1408) and Ashikaga Yoshimasa (足利 義政, 1435 – 1490). They assisted the art of ink paintings to leave the walls of the monasteries, and become a dominating style in Japanese painting. Late 13th and 14th century, respectively, was also the time when a famous Golden Pavillion (year 1389), so-called…

http://www.ink-treasures.com/history/ink-painting/japanese-ink-painting-muromachi-momoyama-period/

 

History of Japanese ink painting in Edo period

History of Japanese ink painting in Edo period (chapter 3, part 1):

Edo period (江戸時代, 1603 – 1868) begins with the death of Toyotomi Hideyoshi (豊臣秀吉, 1536 – 1598). Battle of Sekigahara (関ヶ原の戦い), often referred to the battle of battles, was the event of utmost importance in Japanese history. This extremely bloody battle was won by Tokugawa Ieyasu (徳川家康, 1543 – 1616), who in 1603 became the shogun and consolidated the power as a ruler of Japan. Tokugawa cleverly utilized the victory by establishing the hegemony of the Tokugawa family which lasted for 250 years. It was the last shogunate to control Japan. One of the most profound decisions made by the Tokugawa shogunate was the official order of complete isolation of Japan from the outside influence (starting from the year 1635). Japanese were not permitted to leave the islands, and foreigners were not allowed to enter Japan. Any breach of this law was penalised by death…

http://www.ink-treasures.com/history/ink-painting/japanese-ink-painting-edo-period/

 

 

History of Japanese ink painting in Edo period

History of Japanese ink painting in Edo period (chapter 3, part 2):

Painter of the Rinpa school based their art on multiple styles: yamato-e of the Heian period (平安時代, 794 – 1185), suibokuga of the…

http://www.ink-treasures.com/history/ink-painting/japanese-ink-painting-in-edo-period-part-2/

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